Getz/Gilberto Week: Day 4 – Stone Flower

Getz Gilberto

It’s publication day for Getz/Gilberto! Today Bryan McCann introduces us to a “masterpiece” album that remains little known even in Brazil, yet deserves our attention… Sometimes great things come from inauspicious beginnings. The Adventurers, a 1970 film directed by Lewis Gilbert, based on a Harold Robbins potboiler, is an agglomeration of every imaginable stereotype of brutal, exotic Latin America. Although the film is loosely based on events in the Dominican Republic, it is set in Cortoguay, a fictional country where the ragged campesino rebellion of the Mexican Revolution, the tropical splendor of…

Getz/Gilberto Week: Day 3 – Bossa, Brasília and Jet Travel

Getz Gilberto

Today, 33 1/3 Brazil author Bryan McCann explores how bossa nova links to two other important cultural developments in mid-’50s Brazil: air travel and the construction of the “airplane city”, Brasília. Bossa nova came from Rio de Janeiro—directly from its beaches, nightclubs and middle-class apartment buildings and indirectly from its downtown streets and hillside favelas. But because it emerged when it did—in the late 1950s—it is inextricably linked to two phenomena that pull it away from the specificity of Rio de Janeiro in different directions: the construction of Brasília and…

Getz/Gilberto Week: Day 2 – Bossa v. Bolsonaro

João Gilberto

Bryan McCann, author of João Gilberto and Stan Getz’s Getz/Gilberto, is guest-blogging for us all week. Today he delves into the relationship between bossa nova and politics, asking: what hope does the music hold for Brazilians in the current political climate? Getz/Gilberto was recorded in March of 1963 but not released until late February of 1964. By the time it came out, Brazil was in the midst of political crisis: tens of thousands of citizens took to the streets of Brazil’s major cities, demanding the ouster of President João Goulart. In…

Getz/Gilberto Week: Day 1 – Nothing Like The First Time

Getz Gilberto

This month we’re bringing you two new books in the Brazilian strand of our 33 1/3 Global series! The first is on João Gilberto and Stan Getz’s Getz/Gilberto with its hit single “The Girl From Ipanema”: a game-changing album, as author Bryan McCann explains… The first time I really listened to João Gilberto, as opposed to hearing him in an anodyne background setting, was as a DJ at WPRB FM in the spring of 1987. I had wangled my way into a slot early on Sunday mornings by pretending to know something about…

dc Talk Week: Day 4 – Secular or Saved?

For their final blog post, dc Talk’s Jesus Freak authors Will Stockton and G. Wilson invite you to take a quiz to find out… are you closer to Christ or Satan? As young music critics for Christ, one of our favorite games to play was “Secular or Saved”. It went something like this: grab a friend. Grab a radio. Turn the dial at random. When a song comes through, ask each other: is this artist sanctified by the blood of our one true Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, or is this…

dc Talk Week: Day 3 – Where Are They Now?

It’s publication day for dc Talk’s Jesus Freak! In today’s post, the authors delve into where the members of dc Talk are nowadays… As a teenager, one of my favorite things about going to the orthodontist was the opportunity the waiting room afforded me to read People Magazine and catch up on the afterlives of my favorite 1980s sitcom stars. “Where Are They Now” headlines still make for easy clickbait: a fun way to chase celebrity gossip and track your favorite stars on their fall off the mountain. It has long been…

dc Talk Week: Day 2 – Top Ten dc Talk Songs

In their second post this week, 33 1/3 authors Will Stockton and D. Gilson list their top 10 dc Talk songs, and why they’ve declared them the best of the best. Contemporary Christian Music (CCM) is derivate, sure. It feeds off mainstream styles. But for adolescents, especially, that’s why it works. Without question, dc Talk was the most important CCM band of the 1990s. Their five albums – their self-titled debut (1989), Nu Thang (1990), Free at Last (1992), Jesus Freak (1995), and Supernatural (1998) – soundtracked our faith as white…

dc Talk Week: Day 1 – How We Became Jesus Freaks

This week, Will Stockton and D. Gilson, authors of the new 33 1/3 on dc Talk’s Jesus Freak, will be taking over the blog in celebration of their book’s upcoming publication. Here they cordially invite you to meet the Jesus Freaks. It almost sounds like the set-up to a joke: two gay atheists / cultural critics / English professors write a book about a Christian band from the nineties. But give us a second to explain. We weren’t always this way. In 1995, we were evangelical teenagers with hearts for…

Siouxsie and the Banshees Week: Day 4 – “Peek-A-Boo” Part 2

To celebrate the recent publication of Siouxsie and the Banshees’ Peepshow, author Samantha Bennett will be guest-blogging all week. In her final post, Samantha looks at the influence that silent films had on the music video for their critically acclaimed song, “Peek-A-Boo.” Peepshow features numerous references to silent filmmaking, particularly its technical facets, including the use of light and shade and vignette. This influence extends into the ‘Peek-A-Boo’ video, particularly in the way that Siouxsie and The Banshees are depicted as separate protagonists. Sioux is a leading lady, the focal point…

Siouxsie and the Banshees Week: Day 3 – “Peek-A-Boo” Part 1

To celebrate the recent publication of Siouxsie and the Banshees’ Peepshow, author Samantha Bennett will be guest-blogging all week. In today’s post, she focuses on Peepshow‘s lead single, “Peek-A-Boo,” and the role that Caligarisme played in the song’s music video. Take a look at the topsy-turvy, surrealist evidence below… Released in July 1988, ‘Peek-A-Boo’ was Peepshow‘s lead single, as well as one of Siouxsie and the Banshees’ most commercially successful and critically acclaimed song. The inclusion of Warren and Mercer’s ‘Jeepers Creepers’ quotation in the ‘Peek-A-Boo’ chorus is well documented. Less so is that of the…