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33 1/3 Open Call for Proposals 2024

It’s here! The next 33 1/3 open call for proposals starts… NOW! If you’re a 33 1/3 fan, writer, or music lover now is your chance to submit to the series. All guidelines can be found here.

The deadline for proposals is March 29th 2024 at 11:59 PM EST. We can’t wait to see what you’ve got!

9 thoughts on “33 1/3 Open Call for Proposals 2024”

  1. Not sure if its my favorite album, but it’s a therapy: Radiohead’s Kid A. Post-rock is all about the ambiance the music creates — the scenery. The vivid textures of this album take me to a realm where my shadows and my subconscious, becomes so vivid. They’re palpable and visceral. In high school, I’d go to my room, pull down the shades, and blast in through my headphones. The outside world was of no concern; I’d be transported to a lucid world where my emotions took shape — and I could sit with them. I want to dissect this album, song by song, describing the landscapes it’s taken me through across the years.

    1. Sounds transcendent, Allie! We’ve actually published a 33 1/3 on Radiohead’s Kid A, by Marvin Lin. Have you read it?

  2. I can prepare an art zine-style book on Q:Are We Not Men? A: We Are DEVO! A fun, historical, humorous guide to listening to the 1970s and the de-evolution of American culture. DEVO’s philosophy and art work will be included in a look at the album.

  3. Ice Cube – Death Certificate
    Common Sense – Resurrection
    Parliament – The Clones of Dr. Funkenstein
    Ohio Players – Pain
    Joni Mitchell – The Hissing of Summer Lawns
    Main Source – Breaking Atom
    Marvin Gaye – What’s Going On
    Average White Band – Soul Searching
    Talking Heads – Remain In Light
    Souls of Mischief – 93 til Infinity
    Michael Jackson – Off The Wall
    Eugene McDaniels – Headless Heroes on the Apocalypse

  4. My proposed 33-1/3 publication would be a song-by-song analysis of Crowded House’s Temple of Low Men, an album that is sort of regarded as a bit of a “dark horse” in their catalog (and at times something of a “sophomore slump”). It’s an oddly bitter little album that came on the heels of a fairly substantial radio hit in “Don’t Dream It’s Over.” In fact, songwriter/vocalist/guitarist joked they should call it Mediocre Follow-Up, though it’s anything but “mediocre.” Finn seemed to want to peel back the layers of whatever made their self-titled debut such a resounding hit to reveal a much darker, sometimes mordant and sad core to his songwriting, though he never sacrifices his facility with melody. I’d love to move through the album in order via the “semi-narrative” provided by the songs themselves, and, truth be told, were I to get a “greenlight” with 33-1/3 I would likely parlay that into an attempt at interviewing Neil Finn and/or Nick Seymour and Mitchell Froom. Sound improbable? Maybe, but…maybe not?

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